NH, Vermont meet in Upper Valley to agree on border

New Hampshire Attorney General John Formella, center, and Vermont Attorney General Charity Clark, right, take a ride on a New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol boat operated by Sgt. Nicholas Haroutunian as they participate in the 12th perambulation of the states’ border on the Connecticut River in Hanover, N.H., on Friday, Oct. 6, 2023. State law requires the Attorneys General inspect the border every seven years following a U.S. Supreme Court decision that settled a 1917 dispute over New Hampshire’s attempt to tax a paper mill near Bellows Falls, Vt., that was located partially in the riverbed, determining that the boundary is the low-water mark on the Vermont side of the river. The actual surveying of the boundary is conducted by representatives of both states’ departments of transportation Formella explained, noting that he and Clark weren’t qualified for that job. “If we had done the work I wouldn’t really trust that it was accurate,” he joked. (Valley News / Report For America - Alex Driehaus) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com.

New Hampshire Attorney General John Formella, center, and Vermont Attorney General Charity Clark, right, take a ride on a New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol boat operated by Sgt. Nicholas Haroutunian as they participate in the 12th perambulation of the states’ border on the Connecticut River in Hanover, N.H., on Friday, Oct. 6, 2023. State law requires the Attorneys General inspect the border every seven years following a U.S. Supreme Court decision that settled a 1917 dispute over New Hampshire’s attempt to tax a paper mill near Bellows Falls, Vt., that was located partially in the riverbed, determining that the boundary is the low-water mark on the Vermont side of the river. The actual surveying of the boundary is conducted by representatives of both states’ departments of transportation Formella explained, noting that he and Clark weren’t qualified for that job. “If we had done the work I wouldn’t really trust that it was accurate,” he joked. (Valley News / Report For America - Alex Driehaus) Copyright Valley News. May not be reprinted or used online without permission. Send requests to permission@vnews.com. valley news / report for america — Alex Driehaus

By ALEX DRIEHAUS

Valley News Staff Photographer

Published: 10-06-2023 5:32 PM

New Hampshire Attorney General John Formella and Vermont Attorney General Charity Clark participated in the 12th perambulation of the states’ border on the Connecticut River in Hanover on Friday.

State law requires the attorneys general inspect the border every seven years following a U.S. Supreme Court decision that settled a 1917 dispute over New Hampshire’s attempt to tax a paper mill near Bellows Falls, Vt., that was located partially in the riverbed, determining that the boundary is the low-water mark on the Vermont side of the river.

The actual surveying of the boundary is conducted by representatives of both states’ departments of transportation Formella explained, noting that he and Clark weren’t qualified for that job.

“If we had done the work I wouldn’t really trust that it was accurate,” he joked.

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